Post Process

Everything to do with E-discovery & ESI

Off the Beaten Path (Weekend musings, March 12, 2011):

Posted by rjbiii on March 13, 2011

Data is Beautiful

Flowing Data posts a its review of the latest book in the Beautiful Data series. From the article:

While visualization can get very technical, the authors do a good job of keeping things abstract enough so that you know what they’re talking about even if you’re not particularly experienced in the field. They provide enough detail though that it’s still interesting for others.

A lot of people who are interested in visualization think that’s it’s a matter of learning a bunch of tools, but there’s a lot more to it than that. You’re also learning about data, and learning what questions to ask, and if you don’t know what questions to ask, you just end up with visualization that doesn’t really mean anything. Design also plays a role in in conveying the message you want. So it’s great that there’s a resource that can help you get into the experts’ heads.

If anything, it’s just fun to read about the process of how a graphic or tool gets made. For example, Jonathan Feinberg, who designed the ever popular Wordle, explains what went into the work. Some people like to knock it, but he knows plenty well that the stylized word clouds aren’t the best way to visualize data or extract information, or whatever.

Dude…where’s my car?

You may have seen the news that UCSD researchers had engaged in experiments to take control of your car’s computer using various methods, including this one:

But their most interesting attack focused on the car stereo. By adding extra code to a digital music file, they were able to turn a song burned to CD into a Trojan horse. When played on the car’s stereo, this song could alter the firmware of the car’s stereo system, giving attackers an entry point to change other components on the car. This type of attack could be spread on file-sharing networks without arousing suspicion, they believe. “It’s hard to think of something more innocuous than a song,” said Stefan Savage, a professor at the University of California.

Tagging without permission is…permissible Facebook

Evan Brown, the lawyer behind the blog Internet Cases, posts a summary of the issue of “tagging” information on Facebook. From the article:

The court rejected the mother’s assertion that the photos should not be considered as evidence. She argued that because Facebook allows anyone to post pictures and then “tag” or identify the people in the pictures, she never gave permission for the photographs to be published in this manner. The court held that “[t]here is nothing within the law that requires [one’s] permission when someone takes a picture and posts it on a Facebook page. There is nothing that requires [one’s] permission when she [is] “tagged” or identified as a person in those pictures.”

Linking to Trouble

Well, I’m glad Homeland Security is on top of things like this. I feel much safer now.

In a case against a New York website owner, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is claiming that merely linking to copyrighted material is a crime.

DHS, along with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), seized Brian McCarthy’s domain, channelsurfing.net, in late January. The site has now been replaced with a government warning: “This domain has been seized by ICE – Homeland Security Investigations, Special Agent in Charge, New York Office.”

“It is unlawful to reproduce copyrighted material, such as movies, music, software or games, without authorization… First-time offenders convicted of a criminal felony copyright law will face up to five years in federal prison, restitution, forfeiture and fine.”

The advocacy group Demand Progress has claimed that McCarthy never reproduced copyrighted material, and that his website simply linked to other sites.

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