Post Process

Everything to do with E-discovery & ESI

Building Multilingual Ontologies

Posted by rjbiii on September 19, 2008

A press release from the School of Computing at la Universidad Politécnica de Madrid announces that their researchers have developed a method for building ontologies irrespective of language:

The innovative thing about what these researchers are proposing is the construction of multilingual ontologies using what are known as universal words as the concept name. The concept of universal word stems from the United Nations University’s UNL Project (Universal Networking Language). This project was set up to break down the linguistic barriers on the Internet. The researchers claim that the characteristics of UNL also very close match the features of an ontology.

Continuing:

In an article presented last July at The 2008 International Conference on Semantic Web and Web Services (SWWS’08), these researchers describe their approach and explain a case study demonstrating the validity of their method. The case study used the contents of the current catalogue of Spanish monuments as part of the Patrilex project, funded by the Spanish National Research Plan in conjunction with the Underdirectorate General of Cultural Heritage.

In this case study, the sentences from the catalogue of Spanish monuments were coded in UNL language. This codification is a semantic representation of the catalogue contents. The researchers then searched for predefined linguistic patterns in the semantic representation. After identifying the contents matching the patterns, they instantiated the contents as ontological structures.

The big advantage of using the UNL system is that the universal words are independent of the language and are not ambiguous. The non-ambiguity makes the translation of the ontology built this way to any language extremely precise.

Will the difficulties we currently experience with the production of multi-lingual data sets be consigned to the history bin? Not quickly enough…stay tuned.

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